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Joonhyung Shim
Name
Joon hyung Shim | Assistant Professor
Tel
+82-2-3290-3353
Fax
 
E-mail
shimm@korea.ac.kr
address
519A, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Anamdong, 5-Ga, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul, Korea, 136-713
Education
Aug. 2002 B.S. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
Jan. 2004 M.S. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
Jan. 2009 Ph.D. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
Lab.
Renewable Energy System Lab. (RES Lab)
Low Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (LT-SOFCs)
There has been increased interest in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) because of their high conversion efficiency combined with chemical stability and long life cycles. However, high operating temperatures of about 700 - 1000ºC limit further expansion of these applications due to thermal stresses and rapid degradation. For this reason, our group endeavor to develop ceramic fuel cells operable at reduced temperatures under 300ºC by adopting engineered inorganic materials with ceramic electrolytes that show higher ion conductivity or by optimizing electrolyte-electrode assembly structures to minimize energy losses due to the charge transfer reactions and ion conduction.
Thin Film Renewable Energy Systems
Many energy systems, including fuel cells, batteries and solar cells, are based on thin film formats. Thus, development of versatile and economical thin film fabrication techniques is key to innovate energy applications. Our experience with a variety of thin film deposition techniques, including atomic layer deposition (ALD), pulsed laser deposition (PLD), and sputtering, will help me develop and apply novel fabrication processes suitable for effective production of energy devices. We also evaluate the energy films using high-end characterization techniques to find a room to enhance performance of the films. Example techniques include scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and secondary mass ion spectrometry (SIMS).
Among various thin film fabrication techniques, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has become a leading process used to achieve quality films that yield a high degree of thickness control and conformality in the most demanding nanostructures. Although ALD has been popular mostly in semiconductor industries, there has been a recent attempt to use ALD for fabrication of energy devices, including fuel cells, batteries, catalysts, and solar cells. We develop a novel ALD system that is capable to evaporate liquid or solid chemicals effectively and to deposit high-quality oxides and metals at elevated temperatures. Using this system, we attempt to fabricate various energy materials such as ion conducting ceramics, catalytic metals, materials for photovoltaic applications and rechargeable batteries
Smart Grid with Renewable Energy Systems
The smart-grid is a newly proposed modernized electricity network that has been promoted as a way to achieve energy independence and to reduce emission of environmentally harmful pollutants in minimized costs. In the system, capability of integrating alternative sources of electricity such as solar and wind power is essential. For this, we address economical and efficient combinations of novel and conventional power sources on or off-grid power systems by simulations. In our modeling, various electrical power components including photovoltaics, biomass, diesel engines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, wind turbines, hydropower, cogeneration, batteries, and electrolyzers can be incorporated toward an optimized electricity generation grid.